Unterschiede

Hier werden die Unterschiede zwischen der gewählten und der aktuellen Version gezeigt.

kulturen:koeroes_english_version 03.06.2009 14:21 kulturen:koeroes_english_version 23.03.2015 17:52 aktuell
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Typical bone tools in the Körös culture are so-called spatulae. They are spoon-shaped and come in differenzt sizes. Rings, knives, drills, awls and needles were made from bone (Makkay 1990; Makkay 1992, pl. 33; Kutzián 1947, pl. 48); mattocks, picks and axes were also made from antler (Kutzián 1947, pl. 48,5). Typical bone tools in the Körös culture are so-called spatulae. They are spoon-shaped and come in differenzt sizes. Rings, knives, drills, awls and needles were made from bone (Makkay 1990; Makkay 1992, pl. 33; Kutzián 1947, pl. 48); mattocks, picks and axes were also made from antler (Kutzián 1947, pl. 48,5).
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===== Chronological relations  ===== ===== Chronological relations  =====
-Just like the [[starcevo_english_version|Starčevo]] culture, the Körös culture belongs to those cultures making and using painted pottery in the south-east European early Neolithic. Here, we can also mention other cultures that belong to this sphere, e. g.  the Criş culture in Romania, the cultural groups Anzabegovo-Vršnik and Veluška-Tumba-Porodin in Crna Gora, the west Bulgarian early Neolithic, the Thracian  Karanovo I culture and the Greek Proto-Sesklo and Sesklo culture. However, painted pottery is very rare in the Körös culture, unpainted ware occurs more frequently. Unfortunately, most chronological studies concerned with the early Neolithic rely on painted pottery. Since it is so rare in the Körös culture, it is rather difficult to establish a chronological framwork.+Just like the [[starcevo_english_version|Starčevo]] culture, the Körös culture belongs to those cultures making and using painted pottery in the south-east European early Neolithic. Here, we can also mention other cultures that belong to this sphere, e. g.  the Criş culture in Romania, the cultural groups Anzabegovo-Vršnik and Veluška-Tumba-Porodin in Macedonia, the west Bulgarian early Neolithic, the Thracian  Karanovo I culture and the Greek Proto-Sesklo and Sesklo culture. However, painted pottery is very rare in the Körös culture, unpainted ware occurs more frequently. Unfortunately, most chronological studies concerned with the early Neolithic rely on painted pottery. Since it is so rare in the Körös culture, it is rather difficult to establish a chronological framwork.
Therefore, it is not surprising that up to today there is no classification of chronological aspects in the Körös culture, although we have to bear in mind that white and black painting does occur, so the Körös culture might have occupied the same space of time as the neighboured [[starcevo_english_version|Starčevo]] culture, i. e. about 500 to 600 years. Some places yielded new 14C dates (Gyalarét: 6110-5730 BC; Maroslele-Pana: 6440-6230 BC; Röszke-Lúdvár: 5930-5720 BC; Endrőd 39: 6030-5660, 6030-5620, 6200-5550, 5930-5520 BC; Méhtelek: 5810-5620, 5670-5470, 5630-5470 BC etc.; cal. 2 sigma. After Whittle et al. 2005, 351-352). Therefore, it is not surprising that up to today there is no classification of chronological aspects in the Körös culture, although we have to bear in mind that white and black painting does occur, so the Körös culture might have occupied the same space of time as the neighboured [[starcevo_english_version|Starčevo]] culture, i. e. about 500 to 600 years. Some places yielded new 14C dates (Gyalarét: 6110-5730 BC; Maroslele-Pana: 6440-6230 BC; Röszke-Lúdvár: 5930-5720 BC; Endrőd 39: 6030-5660, 6030-5620, 6200-5550, 5930-5520 BC; Méhtelek: 5810-5620, 5670-5470, 5630-5470 BC etc.; cal. 2 sigma. After Whittle et al. 2005, 351-352).